Avianca resumes twelve international routes and increases capacity.

Starting this June, Avianca will resume direct flights from Bogota to Fort Lauderdale, Washington, Los Angeles, San Juan de Puerto Rico, Panama City, La Paz and Santa Cruz de la Sierra; from San Salvador to Panama City, and from Guatemala City to Tegucigalpa. Likewise, in July it will resume direct operations from Bogota to Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro; and from San Pedro Sula to Miami.

It will also increase capacity by up to 13% on 26 domestic routes in Colombia, with a special focus on regional routes from Cartagena to Pereira and Bucaramanga; from Cali to Barranquilla, Santa Marta, Pasto and Tumaco; as well as from Bogota to Corozal, Yopal, Manizales, Pasto and Villavicencio.

Avianca will increase capacity on six international routes from Bogotá to cities such as New York, Miami, Quito, Guayaquil, San José and Madrid; and from San Salvador to seven routes: Washington, New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Dallas, San Pedro Sula and Toronto.

“As travel restrictions have been lifted, we have been able not only to resume routes that we had to suspend, but also to strengthen our operation by increasing frequencies and seats on domestic and international destinations in our network in Colombia, Central America, South America, North America and the Caribbean,” said Daniel Fajardo, Vice President of Network Planning.

“Our customers have at their disposal an extensive network of more than 90 routes and the “Vuela a tu medida” program, with which they can choose the form of travel that best suits their needs. We remain committed to strengthening point-to-point connectivity and offering a product for everyone to fly,” said Fajardo.

With the strengthened operation, the airline will offer more than 350,000 seats per week in more than 1,200 frequencies by June, with more than 90 active routes throughout its network, which includes the domestic operation in Colombia and Ecuador, the extensive international network in Colombia and the robust operation from Central America to North and South America.

Photo: Alan Wilson/Wikimedia

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